VaNews

Monday August 21, 2017


Executive Branch


IN TRAGIC FIRST, VA. GOVERNOR PRESIDES AT FUNERAL FOR MAN ON HIS SECURITY DETAIL

By LAURA VOZZELLA , Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

More than 1,000 mourners gathered Friday to remember Berke Bates, the state trooper-pilot, devilish practical joker, father, husband and friend to Virginia governors who died last weekend while patrolling the skies over a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville.



MOURNERS HONOR 2ND TROOPER KILLED IN CHARLOTTESVILLE CRASH

By SARAH VOGELSONG, Progress Index (Metered paywall - 5 free articles a month)

As the helicopters he so loved in life flew overhead, hundreds gathered Saturday morning at Chesterfield’s Southside Church of the Nazarene to honor the last journey of Virginia State Police Lt. H. Jay Cullen, 48, to his final resting place.



FUNERAL HELD FOR VIRGINIA TROOPER KILLED IN HELICOPTER CRASH

By ALAN SUDERMAN, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Hundreds of mourners gathered Saturday for the funeral of a Virginia state trooper who died in the fatal crash of a helicopter that had been monitoring a violent, white nationalist protest in Charlottesville. Family, friends, political leaders and police officers from around the country honored Lt. Jay Cullen at Southside Church of the Nazarene near Richmond.



AT LEAST 1,200 ATTEND FUNERAL FOR STATE POLICE PILOT JAY CULLEN, WHO DIED IN CHARLOTTESVILLE HELICOPTER CRASH

By JEFF E. SCHAPIRO, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The second of two state police pilots killed when their helicopter crashed after monitoring street violence in Charlottesville between white supremacists and counterprotesters a week ago was remembered Saturday by friends, family and Virginia’s governor for his quiet commitment to duty and leading the department’s air wing more by listening than talking.



MOURNERS REMEMBER VIRGINIA TROOPER KILLED IN COPTER CRASH

By ALAN SUDERMAN, Progress Index (Metered paywall - 5 free articles a month)

A state police trooper who died in the fatal crash of a helicopter that had been monitoring a violent white-nationalist protest in Charlottesville was remembered Friday as a devoted family man and proud law enforcement officer. Gov. Terry McAuliffe was among those who attended the funeral for Trooper-Pilot Berke Bates at St. Paul's Baptist Church in Richmond on Friday.



MCAULIFFE TEMPORARILY BANS PROTESTS AT GENERAL LEE STATUE IN RICHMOND

By JENNA PORTNOY, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) on Friday temporarily blocked protests at the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee in a residential neighborhood in Richmond, following violent clashes in Charlottesville that led to three fatalities. In an executive order issued at about 5 p.m., he suspended the issuance of permits for protests until a task force lead by Brian Moran, the state’s secretary of public safety and homeland security, writes new emergency regulations.



MCAULIFFE TO TALK REVENUES MONDAY, SHADOWED AGAIN BY FEDERAL BUDGET UNCERTAINTY

By MICHAEL MARTZ, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

As Gov. Terry McAuliffe begins to prepare his final state budget proposal, he will start with a revenue surplus, a revamped economic development program and a huge amount of political uncertainty over spending by the federal government. McAuliffe, who will step down on Jan. 13, will address the General Assembly’s Republican-controlled budget committees on Monday with the same mission he began almost four years ago to diversify a state economy that is too reliant on federal defense spending to remain reliably competitive with other states.

State Elections


CHARLOTTESVILLE AND TRUMP’S RESPONSE RESHAPE VIRGINIA GUBERNATORIAL RACE

By JONATHAN MARTIN, New York Times (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The bloody white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., has thrust race and history to the forefront of this year’s campaign for governor in Virginia, a tradition-bound state whose identity has always been rooted in a past that is as proud for some residents as it is painful for others.



HOW VIRGINIA VOTERS COULD HELP DECIDE THE FATE OF CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS

By BROCK VERGAKIS , Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The Confederate monuments in downtown Norfolk and Portsmouth were born in the Jim Crow era and have survived in places of prominence for decades long after desegregation. Statewide elections this November could help determine if that changes. Virginia law prohibits the removal of war monuments and memorials, but there's confusion over whether the law applies to monuments erected before 1998



GILLESPIE CONDEMNS WHITE SUPREMACY AT AMERICANS FOR PROSPERITY SUMMIT IN RICHMOND

By PATRICK WILSON, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

GOP gubernatorial nominee Ed Gillespie told the annual Americans for Prosperity summit on Saturday that conservatives reject the white supremacists who caused violence in Charlottesville last weekend and called them “the presence of evil in the world.” Most of the white supremacists came from outside Virginia, he said. “These people were not on a legitimate left-to-right spectrum of any kind,” Gillespie said, drawing applause.



THIS WISCONSIN DEMOCRAT GAVE $115K TO ELECT VA.’S FIRST TRANSGENDER LAWMAKER

By FENIT NIRAPPIL , Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

In her bid to become Virginia’s first openly transgender lawmaker, Democrat Danica Roem is getting a major boost from a donor who lives 800 miles away. They’ve never met. She’s not even sure how to pronounce his name. Milwaukee County Executive Chris Abele, a Democrat, has given $115,000 to Roem’s candidacy, nearly half of the money she has raised so far, and plans to keep contributing through the November election.

Congress


KAINE: VIRGINIA SHOULD CONSIDER A STATUE OF POCAHONTAS INSTEAD OF ROBERT E. LEE

By MICHAEL COLLINS, USA Today

Pocahontas over Robert E. Lee? Yes, Virginia, you do have a choice. Sen. Tim Kaine, the Democrats’ vice presidential nominee last year, suggested Sunday his home state should take a broader view of history when deciding which of its citizens are honored with statues in the U.S. Capitol.



SENS. WARNER AND KAINE SAY CONGRESS HAS TO REASSERT ITS AUTHORITY BECAUSE OF TRUMP'S WEAKENED PRESIDENCY

By BILL BARTEL , Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Virginia’s two U.S. senators didn’t hide their disgust Friday with President Donald Trump’s unwillingness to condemn white supremacists’ deadly rally in Charlottesville last week, saying his inability to lead requires Congress to reassert its authority to govern. Speaking at separate settings in South Hampton Roads, Sens. Mark Warner and Tim Kaine, both Democrats, said Republican Trump’s refusal to condemn the hate groups diminishes the executive branch’s moral authority.



OUTSIDERS BROUGHT 'BITTER FANTASY' TO CHARLOTTESVILLE, KAINE SAYS IN SHORE VISIT

By CAROL VAUGHN, delmarvanow

Sen. Tim Kaine addressed Charlottesville's deadly white nationalist and neo-Nazi rally, and took questions on education, health care and poultry houses during a visit to Cape Charles on Thursday.

Economy/Business


VIRGINIA COAL IS REBOUNDING, BUT IS DONALD TRUMP TO THANK?

By CARMEN FORMAN, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Coal exports from the United States are up 60 percent from last year, a figure President Donald Trump triumphantly cited at a rally in West Virginia earlier this month. “I made you a promise during the campaign,” Trump said. “As you’ve seen, I’ve kept that promise. As president, we are putting our coal miners back to work. We’ve ended the war on beautiful, clean coal.”



PRESSURE MOUNTING ON VIRGINIA ENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY TO SLOW DOWN PIPELINE WATER CERTIFICATIONS

By ROBERT ZULLO, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Pressure from state lawmakers in both parties, as well as from hundreds of people who showed up at a series of public hearings this month, is mounting on the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality and state Water Control Board to slow or reconsider the water quality certifications it intends to issue for a pair of natural gas pipeline projects.



PIPELINE PROSPECT LEAVES RESIDENTS OF KARST-LADEN MT. TABOR ROAD WITH A SINKING FEELING

By DUNCAN ADAMS, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Neighbors Bob and Donna Jones and Tom and Bonnie Triplett share two strong feelings that sometimes dog their waking hours and bedevil their sleep: bewilderment and dread. Bewilderment because the couples, whose properties abut along Mt. Tabor Road in Montgomery County, struggle to understand why Mountain Valley Pipeline would choose to bury its 42-inch diameter natural gas pipeline through a neighborhood rife with sinkholes, sinking streams, caves and other features of karst terrain.

Higher Education


VCU PROFESSOR WHO LOST SON TO OVERDOSE AIMS TO CHANGE OPIOID PRESCRIBING PRACTICES

By KATIE O’CONNOR , Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

A picture in VCU Health’s ambulatory center downtown looks, from a distance, like a tree. “But if you get closer,” said Dr. A. Omar Abubaker, “you see it’s actually a collection of faces and images. To me, the opioid epidemic, both to clinicians and to the public, it’s from a distance. If I say, ‘Opioid epidemic,’ the first thing you think about are the graphs, the number of people that died, the statistics.

Virginia Other


FBI TRYING TO ID PEOPLE SPOTTED WITH ALLEGED DRIVER OF CAR IN CHARLOTTESVILLE BEFORE CAR ATTACK

By DEAN SEAL , Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The FBI is trying to identify individuals spotted with James A. Fields Jr. before he allegedly rammed his car into a crowd of protesters last Saturday. Two sources have confirmed that FBI officials recently spoke with workers at the Shell Station on Preston Avenue and reviewed video footage taken from the gas station.



MILITIA MEMBER SPEAKS ABOUT GROUP’S ROLE AT RALLY

By BRYAN MCKENZIE , Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

When Nazi marchers came straight down Market Street face-to-face with counter-protesters, members of the Three Percenters militia knew it would be no picnic in the park. “We knew where the entrance would be [in the back of the park],” said C.J. Ross, of Amherst, a Three Percenter. “It was clear they came to fight.” Of many iconic photographs to come out of the Aug. 12 rally of Nazi and white supremacist organizations at Emancipation Park were photos of a line of militia members in military outfits armed with semi-automatic weapons.



JOURNALIST ALLEGES SHE WAS PUNCHED IN THE FACE IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

By BENJAMIN DIN , Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Amid last week’s violence in Charlottesville, a journalist alleges she was punched in the face and thrown to the ground, according to a criminal complaint she filed after the incident. Taylor Lorenz, a journalist for the Hill, was live-streaming from the scene Aug. 12 when a 21-year-old man started screaming for her to stop recording, she said in her written testimony.



INTENTIONAL OR NOT, LOCAL CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS WERE BUILT ON OR NEAR FORMER SLAVE SITES

By KATHERINE HAFNER, AMIR VERA AND RYAN MURPHY , Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

They were taken to a local shop and dressed in fine clothes, then marched to a raised platform under an overhang along Market Square on Main Street. Up to 25 people were auctioned at a time. The Norfolk crowd was usually a small group of traders with offices down the street, looking to buy slaves they could ship down to New Orleans at a big mark-up.



'LOVE IS WHAT'S KEEPING ME GOING:' SUSAN BRO VISITS SITE OF DAUGHTER HEATHER HEYER'S DEATH

By MICHAEL BRAGG, Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

On Saturday afternoon at 1:40, Susan Bro stood at the site where exactly one week ago her daughter, Heather Heyer, was killed in Downtown Charlottesville and invited those around her into an embrace. She stood on 4th Street facing Water Street, staring at the flowers, candles and other tokens left on the pavement to honor Heyer. Bro made sure to be there as close to the time Heyer died as possible.



STUDENTS WHO CONFRONTED TORCH-BEARERS DEMAND U.VA. ACTION

By MICHAEL BRAGG, Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The information that several University of Virginia students initially received the afternoon of Aug. 11 suggested only a handful of white nationalists would march to the Rotunda that night. But it soon became evident to them that that was not the case.



CHARLOTTESVILLE MAYOR WANTS NEW LAWS TO EMPOWER LOCALITIES, SUSPEND GUN LAWS

By ARELIS R. HERNÁNDEZ, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Charlottesville Mayor Michael Signer called on the Virginia state legislature on Friday to convene a special session to push for new laws that would give local governments power to decide the fates of their Confederate war memorials. Signer, a Democrat, also asked that localities be able to suspend some gun laws after his city was besieged by violence during a white nationalist rally last weekend.



GOVERNOR CALLS CHARLOTTESVILLE MAYOR'S REQUEST FOR SPECIAL SESSION OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY 'REDUNDANT'

Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Gov. Terry McAuliffe's office responded to Mayor Mike Signer's call for a special session of the General Assembly to remove Charlottesville's Gen. Robert E. Lee statue calling it "redundant" due to a pending court case. The release said the Governor "hopes the court will rule in the city's favor."



CHARLOTTESVILLE MAYOR CALLS FOR SWIFT REMOVAL OF LEE STATUE

By ALAN SUDERMAN , Associated Press

The mayor of Charlottesville on Friday called for an emergency meeting of state lawmakers to confirm the city’s right to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, a request that was swiftly rejected by the state’s governor. Mayor Mike Signer said recent clashes over race and the Confederacy had turned “equestrian statues into lightning rods” and urged Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe to convene a special session of the General Assembly.



AFTER CHARLOTTESVILLE, SOME RALLY TO TAKE CONFEDERATE NAME OFF SCHOOLS

By MORIAH BALINGIT AND EMMA BROWN, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Outrage over the violence and hate on display during a rally of white supremacists and white nationalists last weekend in Charlottesville has reenergized efforts nationwide to strip Confederate symbols out of American public life — including from the names of public schools. School officials and community members across the country have invoked the Charlottesville events



PENINSULA PROGRESSIVE GROUPS RALLY FOR NAME CHANGE AT HAMPTON'S DAVIS, LEE SCHOOLS

By JOSH REYES, Daily Press (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Steven Brown spoke to a crowd of about 100 in the parking lot of Jefferson Davis Middle School Sunday, where he was once a student decades ago. Back then, he remembered, the marching band wore replica Confederate soldier uniforms, and the yearbook was once called the Rebel and bore the Confederate flag.



ACLU CALLS FOR REMOVAL OF CONFEDERATE MEMORIALS IN VIRGINIA

By ANDREW CAIN, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The American Civil Liberties Union on Sunday called for the removal of Confederate memorials and monuments in Virginia in the aftermath of the deadly Aug. 12 white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Also Sunday, in an appearance on the CBS program “Face the Nation,” U.S. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., suggested replacing Virginia’s statue of Robert E. Lee in Statuary Hall at the U.S. Capitol with one of Pocahontas, teenage civil rights activist Barbara Johns, or L. Douglas Wilder, the nation’s first elected African-American governor.



REPUBLICAN SUPERVISOR CALLS ON COUNTY TO RELOCATE CONFEDERATE STATUE IN LEESBURG

By SYDNEY KASHIWAGI, Loudoun Times

In wake of the deadly protests in Charlottesville, Loudoun County Supervisor Ron Meyer (R-Broad Run) has become the first Republican member of the Board of Supervisors to publicly call for the Confederate statue on the courthouse grounds in Leesburg to be moved. In an opinion piece published in the Washington Examiner, Meyer called Confederate statues a “reminder that parts of our nation celebrated and continues to honor those who sought to keep them enslaved forever.”



THE MOVEMENT TO RELOCATE CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS COMES TO PORTSMOUTH WITH "REMOVE THE STAIN" RALLY

By MARGARET MATRAY , Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

When Amira Bethea drives downtown, her children ask about the meaning behind the Confederate monument at Court and High streets. “It’s tough,” Bethea said. Where to begin ? “It doesn’t represent unity at all. It just reminds me of the war and everything we fought against,” she said.



COLLEGES GRAPPLING WITH BALANCING FREE SPEECH, CAMPUS SAFETY

By MARIA DANILOVA AND JOCELYN GECKER , Associated Press

When Carl Valentine dropped off his daughter at the University of Virginia, he had some important advice for the college freshman: Don’t forget that you are a minority. “She has to be vigilant of that and be concerned about that, always know her surroundings, just be cautious, just be extremely cautious,” said Valentine, 57, who is African-American. A retired military officer, he now works at the Defense Department.



A NEO-NAZI’S RAGE-FUELED JOURNEY TO CHARLOTTESVILLE

By ABIGAIL HAUSLOHNER, PAUL DUGGAN, JACK GILLUM AND AARON C. DAVIS, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Late in his senior year of high school, James A. Fields Jr. was excitedly mapping his future, hoping to join the Army right after graduation. Although his political and social views ran counter to American values — he much preferred authoritarianism and the racial ­purity dogma of the Third Reich — Fields looked forward to soldiering in democracy’s most powerful military. That’s how Derek Weimer, his favorite teacher in 2015, remembers it.



HOW THE DISASTER IN CHARLOTTESVILLE UNFOLDED, AS TOLD BY THE PEOPLE WHO WERE THERE

By NED OLIVER, K. BURNELL EVANS, VANESSA REMMERS AND ROBERT ZULLO , Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

White supremacists from dark corners of the internet planned their now-notorious descent on Charlottesville for months. It ended in civil unrest, a car attack, a helicopter crash and, all told, three deaths. What follows is an account of how the events of last weekend unfolded, as told by the protesters who massed in opposition, the white nationalists who planned it, the state officials charged with managing it all, and the residents of Charlottesville who watched as their progressive college town descended into chaos.



A STARK CONTRAST INSIDE AND OUTSIDE A CHARLOTTESVILLE CHURCH DURING THE TORCH MARCH

By JOE HEIM, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The visitors began arriving early last Friday night at St. Paul’s Memorial Church across the street from the Rotunda at the University of Virginia. Doors opened at 7:30 and within minutes some 600 people filled the pews and lined its walls. Many others were turned away. They had gathered for an interdenominational prayer and song service presented by Congregate Charlottesville, a collection of local clergy organized in opposition to the white nationalist rally planned for the following day in Emancipation Park.



ROBERT E. LEE V: WHAT IT’S LIKE TO CARRY AROUND THIS NAME

By MIKE SEMEL, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Robert E. Lee V is the great-great-grandson of Gen. Robert E. Lee. The D.C. resident is also the longtime boys’ athletic director at the Potomac School in McLean, Va., which my children attend. I visited Lee in his office to talk about the role that his name, and the historical monuments that bear it, has played in the last week. Edited excerpts follow.



DUKE UNIVERSITY REMOVES DAMAGED ROBERT E. LEE STATUE

By JONATHAN DREW, Associated Press

Duke University removed a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee early Saturday after it was vandalized amid a national debate about monuments to the Confederacy. The university said it removed the carved limestone likeness before dawn from the entryway to Duke Chapel, where it stood among 10 historical figures.

Local


SOME BLACKS IN PRINCE WILLIAM COUNTY ARE GRATEFUL TO COREY STEWART. OTHERS ARE DEEPLY SUSPICIOUS.

By ANTONIO OLIVO, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The NAACP chapter in Prince William County is condemning Board of County Supervisors Chairman Corey A. Stewart for what it sees as his dangerous alliance with white nationalists after the violence Aug. 12 in Charlottesville. Meanwhile, residents of a historic black enclave in the county are praising Stewart (R) for fighting to keep Dominion Energy from building power lines through their Carver Road neighborhood.



LOCAL SCHOOL PULLED INTO CONFEDERATE CONTROVERSY

By KRISTIN SMITH, WRIC

The conflict over Confederate statue statues is now overshadowing a local school. Lee-Davis High School is known as the ‘Home of the Confederates.’ But right now, there is a lot of back-and-forth within the community about whether the school should change its name and mascot.



NEWPORT NEWS AIRPORT PAYING OUT BIG MONEY IN LEGAL FEES

By PETER DUJARDIN, Daily Press (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Dealing with several significant legal issues has led to a huge spike in the lawyer fees that Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport has had to dish out in recent months. So far this year, the airport has racked up $320,297 in legal fees, with the total expected to soon top $400,000. That's higher than the previous seven years put together.



TOWNEBANK GOT MONEY BACK AND MORE ON PEOPLE EXPRESS LOAN

By DAVE RESS, Daily Press (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

TowneBank got more than its money back because of the Peninsula Airport Commission’s secret decision to guarantee People Express Airline’s debts — the bank also made a modest profit on the deal. TowneBank received interest and fees totaling $115,625 on top of full repayment from taxpayer funds of $5 million borrowed by the defunct People Express Airlines, according to auditor records obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request.



PORTSMOUTH PUBLIC HOUSING TENANTS HAVE BEEN FIGHTING MOLD FOR YEARS – WITH LITTLE HELP FROM PRHA

By ANA LEY , Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Inch by inch, it has claimed thousands of dollars worth of mattresses, couches, jackets and shoes from some of the city’s poorest people. The mold has reached at least eight first-floor homes in the Hamilton Place apartment complex in the last four years, shifting from white to green to black as it creeps along walls, carpets and, finally, furnishings and other belongings. Low-income tenants there say they’re sick of scrubbing the stuff out.



IN CHARLOTTESVILLE, SOME SAY STATUE DEBATE OBSCURES A DEEP RACIAL SPLIT

By JOHN ELIGON, New York Times (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

One of the joys of growing up, for Deborah Bell-Burks, was sitting on the counter of the general store that her family owned on Main Street, helping her mother bag items and count change. A bicycle ride through the neighborhood would take her past a grocery, a barbershop and a cobbler’s shop. And most of the people she would see, well-off business owners and customers alike, were black like her, offering an early lesson in what she could become.



CHARLOTTESVILLE SCHOOLS PREPARING TO ADDRESS DEADLY RALLY

By JOSH MANDELL, Daily Progress (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Since a white nationalist rally brought hateful speech, violence and death to the Charlottesville community on Aug. 12, local educators have been preparing to support students and teach them about what took place. Charlottesville Superintendent Rosa Atkins said last week that the city school division was attending to the needs of school leaders and teachers, so that they in turn could attend to the needs of students.

Online News


ORGANIZER OF CHARLOTTESVILLE WHITE SUPREMACIST RALLY CALLS SLAIN PROTESTER’S DEATH ‘PAYBACK TIME’

Washington Times

The Twitter account of Jason Kessler, the alt-right activist and organizer of last weekend’s deadly “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, tweeted that the woman who died protesting his event “was a fat, disgusting Communist” and that her death was “payback time” — then walked back the remark and blamed it on drugs and alcohol.



CIVIL WAR WEEKEND CANCELLATION A BUST FOR SMALL BUSINESS

Potomac Local

The annual Civil War Weekend in Downtown Manassas is canceled. The three-day event that had been planned for Aug. 25, 26, and 27 draws hundreds to the city each August, where period re-enactors flock to the city museum lawn to show how Civil War soldiers lived. Live bands and a period dance were also planned as part of the event.



THE MANY MOVES OF WILLIAMSBURG’S CONFEDERATE MONUMENT

By STEVE ROBERTS, JR., Williamsburg-Yorktown Daily

Tucked away from the hustle and bustle of Duke of Gloucester Street in Bicentennial Park stands a war memorial to Confederate soldiers. The light traffic and seclusion have kept the monument out of the public’s eye. Until now.


Editorials


WHY DID ROANOKE NEVER PUT UP ANY CONFEDERATE STATUES?

Roanoke Times Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Here’s something that’s not happening in Roanoke. We don’t have any protests over our Confederate statues. There’s an easy explanation for why Roanoke isn’t seeing the protests that have engulfed other cities. We don’t have any Confederate statues — at least if you stick with the dictionary definition of a statue to mean a representation of a person.



PORTSMOUTH SHOULDN'T BAN RACIST PROTESTERS BUT IT SHOULD WORK TO CURB VIOLENCE

Virginian-Pilot Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Portsmouth City leaders will discuss on Monday whether they can prohibit racist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan from holding rallies or protests in their community. Councilman Mark Whitaker asked that the discussion be added to the agenda. His concerns are an understandable reaction to the violence last week in Charlottesville surrounding the “Unite the Right” protest by white supremacists and other groups at a city park formerly named for Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.



RALLY RULING: QUESTIONS ON FREE SPEECH

Daily Progress Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Hindsight clearly tells us that the Aug. 12 rally that turned so violent here should have been held in McIntire Park, instead of easily congested downtown Charlottesville. In a previous editorial, this newspaper assented to the safety need for such an action. In ruling that the rally should be held at its originally planned location, a federal judge also had understandable reasons for his decision. (Remember, his job is to apply the law and the Constitution to the facts as he sees them.)



LEE FOREMOST IN CROSSHAIRS: WHY?

Winchester Star Editorial (Subscription Required)

Why Lee? Why in this week of our angst, these post-Charlottesville days, has so much vitriol been directed toward the South’s foremost hero, a man about whom was once written, “He was a foe without hate; a friend without treachery; a soldier without cruelty; a victor without oppression; and a victim without murmuring”? Mere hours after the sad events in Charlottesville triggered by the city’s decision to remove Gen. Lee’s statue from the park that once bore his name, an Associated Press writer named Russell Contreras tried to explain how “Marse Robert” had ceased being a hero and had become a racist icon. Mr. Contreras failed miserably



DON’T LET THERE BE ANOTHER CHARLOTTESVILLE

Washington Post Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Virginia and Charlottesville authorities say they undertook extensive preparations ahead of last weekend’s white-nationalist rally, but the efforts were clearly inadequate or ill-suited to the basic law enforcement task of keeping large groups of antagonists separated.



TOUGHNESS, FORGIVENESS GO TOGETHER

Daily Progress Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

We’ve said that tough questions are necessary, and tough answers will require courage if we are to face them. But before we even reach that point, we also must take care that the questions and answers are embedded in a matrix of grace. Yes, we must bend all our intellectual and analytical powers to the task of determining faults, if there were any, in our handling of last weekend’s events.



DON'T LET CHARLOTTESVILLE'S GOOD NAME BECOME ANOTHER VICTIM OF THE WHITE SUPREMACISTS

Richmond Times-Dispatch Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

One of the less-noticed tragedies of last weekend’s awful events in Charlottesville is that, in the minds of millions, that good city’s name is now linked to white supremacy and neo-Nazis. This is especially galling because it was precisely the aim of the hate groups that invaded this university town at the foot of the Blue Ridge. They sought to smear a place that embraces everything they abhor: openness, acceptance, diversity, freedom.



NORFOLK HAS A LOT TO CELEBRATE BUT GANG VIOLENCE COULD UNDO THE PROGRESS

Virginian-Pilot Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The city of Norfolk has plenty to celebrate these days. Consider the bustling Granby Street corridor that stretches south past The Main to the lively new Waterside District. Or the Norfolk Premium Outlets, which introduced new retail options to the community when it opened in June.



TROUBLE AND HOPE FOR RICHMOND'S PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Richmond Times-Dispatch Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The public schools in Richmond never leave the news for long, and last week they made news for two reasons. The first is their performance on state standardized tests, which has remained dismal and this year actually got worse. The second is a proposed charter change that would force Mayor Levar Stoney to address the schools’ facility needs.



A SEA-CHANGE IN SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA

Roanoke Times Editorial (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Reality now moves at megabits per second. Perception often limps along far behind. One of the many places where perception has yet to catch up to reality is how Southwest Virginia is viewed by the outside world. Back in the spring, we published a commentary from a Richmond-based environmental group that declaring its support for Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s climate change policy. What caught our eye — and rang untrue to our ears — was this line: “For too long coal-country politicians have rejected any and all energy policy that doesn’t center around burning coal while dishing out false hope that by doing so they are working to bring coal back from the brink.”



ELECTION BELONGS TO THE VOTERS

Daily Press Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Our gubernatorial race is drawing attention, but we have to live with the result. Eleven weeks remain until we elect our next governor, and if you’re not paying attention yet we would urge you to start now. There is a lot at stake here, and an impact that will be felt well beyond the borders of our commonwealth.



JAIL DEATH LEADING TO CHANGES

Virginian-Pilot Editorial (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Two years have passed since officers at the Hampton Roads Regional Jail removed the lifeless body of 24-year-old Jamycheal Mitchell from his cell, and the questions surrounding the case continue to haunt the commonwealth.

Columnists


SCHAPIRO: NORTHAM'S NEW STANCE ON STATUES A MONUMENTAL BLUNDER?

By JEFF E. SCHAPIRO, Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Over an arch at Ralph Northam’s alma mater, the Virginia Military Institute, are the words of a storied professor-turned-dauntless Confederate general, Stonewall Jackson: “You may be whatever you resolve to be.” Northam, who twice voted for Republican George W. Bush for president, apparently has resolved to run for Virginia governor as a liberal national Democrat.



CASEY: KKK LEADER COUNSELS KINDER, GENTLER & 'CHRISTIAN' WHITE NATIONALISM

By DAN CASEY, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

To Buchanan resident Billy Snuffer Sr., neo-Nazis are "idiots" and white supremacists are wrongheaded. The "traditional" Ku Klux Klan, however, such as Snuffer's Rebel Brigade Knights of the True Invisible Empire, are better elements of white nationalism. He's the group's imperial wizard, and he was in Charlottesville last weekend.



TRUMP’S CHARLOTTESVILLE COMMENTS WERE JUST ANOTHER DISTRACTION

By COLBERT I. KING, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

What’s with all the hand-wringing and gnashing of teeth over President Trump’s embrace of his “very fine people” bearing swastikas and spewing racist and anti-Semitic hate at that deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville? What’s new? The Trump on display at Tuesday’s defiant news conference where he stoutly defended the indefensible has been there all along, for all to see.



PITTS: CHARLOTTESVILLE DIDN'T SPRING FROM NOWHERE

By LEONARD PITTS, Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

It is important to look beyond the riot. Yes, last week’s violent demonstration by white supremacists in Charlottesville, Virginia, culminating in the death of 32-year-old Heather Heyer, made for a carnival of obscenity as sickening as it was riveting. But the thing is, it did not spring from nowhere.

Op-Ed


GIBSON: WE MUST STAND AGAINST WHITE SUPREMACY

By BOB GIBSON, Published in the Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 20 articles a month)

Charlottesville has become a symbolic place and a milestone in the nation’s struggle to deal with racism. All of the ugliness, bigotry and violence that swept into town Aug. 11 and 12 has redefined what people think of the name of the city and the University of Virginia.

Gibson is communications director and senior researcher at the University of Virginia’s Cooper Center for Public Service.



NORMENT: A COMMONWEALTH CALL FOR CIVILITY

By SEN. THOMAS K "TOMMY" NORMENT, Published in the Daily Press (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The town of Bedford is a 90-mile drive from Charlottesville. There, the National D-Day Memorial pays tribute to those who lost their lives in the pivotal battle to defeat Nazism more than 70 years ago. That the monument is located in Bedford, which lost more residents per capita in the Normandy invasion than any American community, is a reminder of the sacrifices paid by Virginians. Those sacrifices are also evidence of how Virginians feel about ideologies that espouse hatred.

Thomas K. Norment, Jr. (R-James City), Majority Leader of the Senate of Virginia, represents the 3rd District.



WALLS: TAKING SIDES IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

By TOM WALLS, Published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

I took two walks in Charlottesville last week. On Sunday evening I strolled a few blocks from my downtown home to the spot where Heather Heyer had been killed the day before. I went on to the park with the controversial statue of Robert E. Lee, erected during the Jim Crow era, close by the old slave block where black Virginians were bought and sold in the shade of Jefferson’s courthouse. Near there I caught a twilight view of the verdant hill of Monticello, where Jefferson wrote the poetry of American democracy, but also owned many people.

Tom Walls is executive director of the Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership at the University of Virginia.



FOLLETT: DATA GIVE HOPE AFTER CHARLOTTESVILLE VIOLENCE

By CHELSEA FOLLETT , Published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

It was strange seeing the picturesque college town where I attended graduate school appear on the news, transformed into a painful spectacle of angry tiki torch-bearing protesters and violence. In the aftermath of what happened last weekend in Charlottesville, it can be easy to feel as though the world is deteriorating into ever-greater brutality and chaos, and to lose hope. There is reason for hope. Just look at the data. Humanity has overcome far worse savagery before.

Chelsea Follett is the managing editor of HumanProgress.org, a project of the Cato Institute.



ROBINSON: THE MEANING OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

By GERARD ROBINSON, Published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

My condolences go out to family and friends of Heather Heyer, and Virginia State Police officers H. Jay Cullen and Berke M.M. Bates, who were killed on Saturday, Aug. 12, in what march organizers called “Unite the Right” and march protesters call a white supremacist rally. I also wish a speedy recovery to those injured, and give thanks to law enforcement officers and regular citizens who helped minimize the carnage.

Gerard Robinson is resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and former Virginia secretary of education.



KAINE: VIRGINIANS MUST RESPOND TO THIS PAIN BY ACCELERATING PROGRESS

By TIM KAINE, Published in the Richmond Times-Dispatch (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Last Saturday, America and the world were confronted with scenes of neo-Nazis, Klansmen, and other white supremacists terrorizing the citizens of Charlottesville. Ostensibly protesting the locally elected government’s democratic decision to remove a monument of Robert E. Lee, the ralliers chanted racist, anti-Semitic, homophobic messages having nothing to do with statues or heritage. They came to spew hate.

Tim Kaine represents Virginia in the U.S. Senate.



NEWCITY: MILITARY BASES SHOULD NOT BE NAMED FOR CONFEDERATE OFFICERS

By MICHAEL NEWCITY, Published in the Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The recent violence in Charlottesville has sharpened the focus on the movement to remove or rename memorials to Confederate leaders. ... What is most surprising is that in this heated public debate relatively little attention has been devoted to the largest, most dynamic and famous memorials to Confederate generals: U.S. Army bases.

Michael Newcity is a professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at Duke University.



MORSE: THE WOUNDS OF HISTORY KEEP RISING IN VIRGINIA

By GORDON C. MORSE, Published in the Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

Say what you will about Robert E. Lee. He at least recognized an invasion of the commonwealth when he saw one. “These people” (Marse Robert employed that phrase for the intruding opposition) are coming back. They have said so, and the president of the United States has given full-throated endorsement to their purposes.

Gordon C. Morse wrote editorials for this newspaper in the 1980s and was former Gov. Gerald L. Baliles’ speechwriter.



STONE: BRING BIGGER PICTURE OF HISTORY TO MONUMENT AVENUE

By STEVE STONE, Published in the Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 10 articles a month)

The Confederate leaders memorialized in stone and metal along Richmond’s beautiful Monument Avenue fought for something that is seen by most people today as ugly and repugnant. We can, and do, debate the root causes of the grotesquely bloody war they brought upon this nation. Whether undertaken to throw off the shackles of a burdensome national government bent on usurping states’ rights or intended to lock forever the rusty shackles forced upon fellow human beings kidnapped to serve as beasts of labor, we do know that they were not bent on genocide.

Steve Stone is a former reporter for The Pilot. He lives in Richmond.



LAROCK: WHY DID FREDERICK SCHOOL BOARD OPPOSE LAWMAKERS' BILLS?

By DAVE LAROCK, Published in the Winchester Star (Subscription Required)

As students return to school following summer break, let us look at education policies and funding. Clarke and Frederick Counties have many excellent schools, but even here in our community, too many kids are not having their needs met. Constituents tell me of special-needs kids who are denied the opportunity of reaching their full potential, even after years of parents pleading and sometimes resorting to litigation.

Dave LaRock, R-33rd, is a member of the House Education Committee.