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VaNews

Most Read Articles June 14, 2021


1

Black Virginians Took Ralph Northam Back. Neither Has Forgotten.

By ASTEAD W. HERNDON, New York Times (Metered Paywall - 1 to 2 articles a month)

Alonzo Jones, a Black mayor in Southern Virginia, was used to the playbook of a white politician facing allegations of racism. So when Gov. Ralph Northam visited his town after a racist photograph was discovered on the governor’s medical school yearbook page, Mr. Jones expected more of the same: a requisite visit to a Black church, a news conference with Black allies, and promises of growth moving forward.


2

Green Front Furniture exec buys Monument Avenue mansion for $2M

By JONATHAN SPIERS, Richmond BizSense

When Den Cralle begins furnishing the Mediterranean-style mansion he recently purchased on Monument Avenue, he’ll be coming at it with an entire furniture business at his disposal. The president and co-owner of Farmville-based Green Front Furniture won a bidding war this spring for 2315 Monument Ave., a nearly century-old house he’s planning to use not only as a residence but also as a virtual showroom of sorts, highlighting the company’s inventory of furniture, rugs and home décor items.


3

State's new cannabis website answers questions, sort of

By MONIQUE CALELLO, News Leader (Metered Paywall - 3 to 4 articles a month)

Marijuana legalization in Virginia begins July 1. To help Virginians understand what this means, the state launched a new cannabis website on Thursday with information, updates and answers to questions about the law, tweeted Governor Ralph Northam. On April 7, Virginia became the first state in the South to begin the process of legalizing adult-use cannabis, the site states. What exactly does begin the process mean?


4

EDITORIAL: Fifty years after his death, Reynolds' influence remains

Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 5 articles a month)

Fifty years today a single man died, and with his passing, Virginia politics — and perhaps American politics — shifted its course. That man was J. Sargeant Reynolds. At the time he was the 34-year-old scion of the Reynolds Metal family — and Virginia’s lieutenant governor. He was on a path that, if conventional wisdom at the time held, would have soon taken him to the governorship — and, many believe, the U.S. Senate and perhaps a presidential run beyond that.


5

Once again, Virginia Democrats are looking to female candidates to cement their grip on power

By GREGORY S. SCHNEIDER, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 3 articles a month)

This fall's elections for all 100 seats in the Virginia House of Delegates will look unlike any the state has ever seen, with women leading the way in unprecedented fashion for Democrats and contests playing out in parts of the state that haven't seen competitive races in years. While both major parties are fielding a record number of female candidates, Democrats have crossed a historic threshold: for the first time, women account for more than half of the party's House nominees, 50 out of a total of 97.


6

From VPAP Maps, Timeline of COVID-19 in Virginia

The Virginia Public Access Project

Our Virginia COVID-19 dashboard features VDH vaccination data, including what percentage of the state's population has received at least one shot and the number of vaccinations per 100,000 residents in each city and county. Our dashboard also makes it easy to track the latest available data for tests performed, infections, deaths and hospital capacity. There's also a filter for each city and county, plus an exclusive per-capita ZIP Code map. Updated each morning around 10:30 a.m.


7

Fact-Checker: McAuliffe doubles down on false budget claim that has been fact-checked three times

By GLENN KESSLER, Washington Post (Metered Paywall - 3 articles a month)

There’s a theme as the former governor — who under Virginia law was not able to hold consecutive terms — seeks to win his old job back. The Democratic primary winner says he knows how to build back an economy and turn things around, frequently claiming that he inherited the largest budget deficit in Virginia’s history from his GOP predecessor. There’s a big problem with this claim: It has been fact-checked as false not once but three times by our colleagues at PolitiFact.


8

Morse: To beat McAuliffe, Youngkin should focus on finances

By GORDON C. MORSE, published in Virginian-Pilot (Metered Paywall - 2 articles a month)

Terry McAuliffe wins election as governor again in November and that’s it. The Democrats roll on. Why does this have to be complicated? Dr. Bold blew the doors off the joint in Tuesday’s primary and the immediate reaction was to say, “let the games begin.” It’s game over. Terry has already been out making nice with his former rivals, state Sen. Jennifer McClellan and Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, waving to the crowds, bragging about the 200,000 jobs he created as Virginia’s 72nd governor, on his way to becoming the 74th.

After writing editorials for the Daily Press and The Virginian-Pilot in the 1980s, Gordon C. Morse wrote speeches for Gov. Gerald L. Baliles.


9

Strickler: VMI report got it wrong

By MIKE STRICKLER, published in Roanoke Times (Metered Paywall - 5 articles a month)

"We write to express our deep concern about the clear and appalling culture of ongoing structural racism at the Virginia Military Institute.” This was the opening sentence of a letter sent to the President of the VMI Board of Visitors on October 19, 2020 by Gov. Northam based on a few individual allegations in the media of racism at VMI. The letter called for an investigation.

Strickler, a 1971 VMI graduate, had a 38 year career at VMI (to include nine as public relations director).


10

Policy advocate Lowe kicks off campaign for GOP nomination in 5th District

By NICK CROPPER, News & Advance (Metered Paywall - 18 articles a month)

Amid the backdrop of gray skies at the Appomattox Court House Historic National Park, Virginia native Kimberly Lowe officially kicked off her campaign Saturday to challenge Rep. Bob Good, R-5th, and secure the Republican nomination in the 2022 primary. "I'm a well-rounded candidate working on lots of issues, and I think that politics should be about making your life better and bringing people together," said Lowe, a resident of Brunswick County.